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OT - The English Language and abuses thereof


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#1 inkman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM

Trying to keep the Nikita thread in tact, we'll dedicate this thread to bitching about how other people speak and write and how we think less of them because of it.  

My biggest beef right now is how lazy English has made it's way into corporate America. It used to be that one would have to be able to articulate thought and ideas in an effective manner to succeed in the work place.  Now, just muttering syllables and slang is acceptable.  

Discussing a recent project at work, our young contract manufacturing associate asked me about the "buh-ehns".  It's become common place for people, rather than fully enunciate words, to shorten the pronunciation to make one's life easier.  So button has become buh-ehns and so on. Can we have just a tiny bit of professionalism?

#2 d4rksabre

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:22 PM

View Postinkman, on 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:

Trying to keep the Nikita thread in tact, we'll dedicate this thread to bitching about how other people speak and write and how we think less of them because of it.  

My biggest beef right now is how lazy English has made it's way into corporate America. It used to be that one would have to be able to articulate thought and ideas in an effective manner to succeed in the work place.  Now, just muttering syllables and slang is acceptable.  

Discussing a recent project at work, our young contract manufacturing associate asked me about the "buh-ehns".  It's become common place for people, rather than fully enunciate words, to shorten the pronunciation to make one's life easier.  So button has become buh-ehns and so on. Can we have just a tiny bit of professionalism?

Professionalism died with the baby boomers.

#3 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:22 PM

View Post26CornerBlitz, on 21 December 2013 - 03:19 AM, said:

Continuing along the OT road, when did it become acceptable for people to write could of instead of could have or could've?  WTH is that? Same thing with should of and would of.  There's a guy that I work with who sometimes uses these abominations in work related email.  I immediately question someone's intelligence when I see this although it's probably unfair for me to do so.

Edited by 26CornerBlitz, 21 December 2013 - 12:40 PM.


#4 ubkev

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:31 PM

Usage of the word ANYMORE in the positive.

We're best friends anymore.

Their pizza is the best anymore.

This is the way things are done anymore.


I had never heard this manner of speaking until I moved out of NY 3 years ago. It has been driving me batshit crazy ever since......anymore!


#5 bunomatic

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:38 PM

My son calls his mother ' me '.  As in, " Me can I have five dollars ? "

I believe its from the Simpsons t.v. show but I could be wrong as I never watch it. This drives me nuts but his mom doesn't seem to mind so I keep my mouth shut.

Me is short for mommy ?

Edited by bunomatic, 21 December 2013 - 12:39 PM.


#6 ubkev

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:42 PM

View Postbunomatic, on 21 December 2013 - 12:38 PM, said:

My son calls his mother ' me '.  As in, " Me can I have five dollars ? "

I believe its from the Simpsons t.v. show but I could be wrong as I never watch it. This drives me nuts but his mom doesn't seem to mind so I keep my mouth shut.

Me is short for mommy ?

That would drive me insane! I think I may snap as this thread goes on.

#7 bunomatic

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:42 PM

View Postubkev, on 21 December 2013 - 12:42 PM, said:

That would drive me insane! I think I may snap as this thread goes on.

lol

#8 skaught

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:47 PM

View Postinkman, on 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:

Discussing a recent project at work, our young contract manufacturing associate asked me about the "buh-ehns".  It's become common place for people, rather than fully enunciate words, to shorten the pronunciation to make one's life easier.  So button has become buh-ehns and so on. Can we have just a tiny bit of professionalism?

So, is that slurred together as one syllable? Or you mean they're just not making a hard T sound? If its the latter, maybe you're the one pronouncing it wrong http://www.merriam-w...ctionary/button

#9 d4rksabre

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:49 PM

View Postskaught, on 21 December 2013 - 12:47 PM, said:

So, is that slurred together as one syllable? Or you mean they're just not making a hard T sound? If its the latter, maybe you're the one pronouncing it wrong http://www.merriam-w...ctionary/button

What?

#10 skaught

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:50 PM

View Postubkev, on 21 December 2013 - 12:31 PM, said:

Usage of the word ANYMORE in the positive.

We're best friends anymore.

Their pizza is the best anymore.

This is the way things are done anymore.


I had never heard this manner of speaking until I moved out of NY 3 years ago. It has been driving me batshit crazy ever since......anymore!

I haven't heard that one, but it would drive me nuts too.

View Postd4rksabre, on 21 December 2013 - 12:49 PM, said:

What?

I guess I'm having a hard time imagining someone saying "buh-ehns"

#11 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:51 PM

Your and You're are not interchangeable. :doh:

#12 PASabreFan

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:53 PM

Heard an interesting segment on the radio recently about how saying "axe" instead of "ask" is actually legitimate, if you want to go way, way back.

(And I will call myself on the use of "actually," which often bothers me.)

#13 Ghost of Dwight Drane

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:58 PM

View Postinkman, on 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:



My biggest beef right now is how lazy English has made it's way into corporate America.  



Is English a coworker and lazy a sirname? Is lazy a verb describing English? Is lazy an adjective? I'm having a hard time grasping the meaning of your post because your grammar is so crappy....

#14 Eleven

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:03 PM

Its bin a wile sense wee had a grammer thread.

Edited by Santa Claus, 21 December 2013 - 01:03 PM.


#15 d4rksabre

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:07 PM

View Postskaught, on 21 December 2013 - 12:50 PM, said:

I haven't heard that one, but it would drive me nuts too.



I guess I'm having a hard time imagining someone saying "buh-ehns"

You must not work in a factory :P

#16 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:07 PM

Another one of my "favorites" :rolleyes:  is I could care less vs I couldn't care less. :lol:

#17 skaught

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:08 PM

View PostGhost of Dwight Drane, on 21 December 2013 - 12:58 PM, said:

Is English a coworker and lazy a sirname? Is lazy a verb describing English? Is lazy an adjective? I'm having a hard time grasping the meaning of your post because your grammar is so crappy....

I believe you used a few too many periods to end that last sentence.

#18 inkman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:12 PM

View Postskaught, on 21 December 2013 - 12:50 PM, said:

I guess I'm having a hard time imagining someone saying "buh-ehns"
I think what you and these people below are discussing is a different issue than what I'm referring to.  I'll see if I can find an example.  http://www.englishfo.../hxnqr/post.htm

View PostGhost of Dwight Drane, on 21 December 2013 - 12:58 PM, said:

Is English a coworker and lazy a sirname? Is lazy a verb describing English? Is lazy an adjective? I'm having a hard time grasping the meaning of your post because your grammar is so crappy....
Grrr...

Sports announcers saying Baldimore rather than Baltimore.  Come on!

Edited by inkman, 21 December 2013 - 01:09 PM.


#19 Sabres Fan In NS

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:17 PM

Ending a sentence with a preposition ... "oh, yeah?  Were's that at?"

And when did every person that you can't remember the name of change their name to "buddy" ... "Oh, yeah!  Buddy gots a lot of work do do."

These two are NS things and you really have to be living here, but not be from here to really appreciate the stupidity of it all.

I love NS, but ...

Edited by Sabres Fan In NS, 21 December 2013 - 01:18 PM.


#20 skaught

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:21 PM

View Postd4rksabre, on 21 December 2013 - 01:07 PM, said:

You must not work in a factory :P

Nope, I work in a robotics lab, but there's plenty of people that say stuff funny. We have one guy from long island that always says "worter" instead of "water" and everytime he says it, everyone starts repeating "worter" back to him until he says it correctly.

#21 JJFIVEOH

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:22 PM

When people use the word 'epic' and 'amazing' every other sentence, it really does diminish it's effectiveness.

The one that bugs my to no end is the incorrect usage of the word 'literally'. "That shot that Leino just missed made me so mad that I literally threw the remote control at the TV." Really? Was there really any other way that could have been taken? Literally, literally, literally................... it literally is every other word out of some people's mouths.

#22 Eleven

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:22 PM

View Postskaught, on 21 December 2013 - 01:21 PM, said:

Nope, I work in a robotics lab, but there's plenty of people that say stuff funny. We have one guy from long island that always says "worter" instead of "water" and everytime he says it, everyone starts repeating "worter" back to him until he says it correctly.

The Long Island and Boston accents might be the most offensive things to the ear, ever.

#23 JJFIVEOH

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:29 PM

People that start sentences with "So............" I've seen it a lot lately in interviews. Almost like some people have become so socially inept that they can't actually respond to the question at hand so they've scripted a bunch of generic responses beforehand. Most often this is true, the answers really have nothing to do with the question. It's a product of the 'robot' generation, learn to memorize and repeat but not actually comprehend what you're learning..... and it carries over socially. Watch Letterman, Leno, Stewart and Colbert, you'll see what I'm talking about now that I've mentioned it.

View Post26CornerBlitz, on 21 December 2013 - 01:07 PM, said:

Another one of my "favorites" :rolleyes:  is I could care less vs I couldn't care less. :lol:

YES!

Edited by JJFIVEOH, 21 December 2013 - 01:33 PM.


#24 phil_soisson

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:31 PM

The most annoying word in the English language (as voted in a Marist poll)..."whatever"

#25 inkman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:34 PM

Drownded.  :wallbash:

#26 carpandean

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:35 PM

My wife complains about people that she has to deal with at her job (not co-workers) using the expression "in a minute" to mean "in a long time."  For example, "I haven't seen you in a minute."

Edited by carpandean, 21 December 2013 - 01:36 PM.


#27 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:42 PM

It is my understanding that English has been bludgeoned so badly that irregardless has made it into the dictionary.  I cringe every time I hear or see this word.  How about regardless or irrespective instead?  :doh:

#28 thanes16

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:43 PM

Posted Today, 01:29 PM

Posted Image26CornerBlitz, on 21 December 2013 - 03:19 AM, said:

"Continuing along the OT road, when did it become acceptable for people to write could of instead of could have or could've?  WTH is that? Same thing with should of and would of.  There's a guy that I work with who sometimes uses these abominations in work related email.  I immediately question someone's intelligence when I see this although it's probably unfair for me to do so."



This. First word usage that popped into my head when I heard the discussion going on.

Oops! I just used one. How do you hear writing?

Edited by thanes16, 21 December 2013 - 01:45 PM.


#29 inkman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:45 PM

View Postcarpandean, on 21 December 2013 - 01:35 PM, said:

My wife complains about people that she has to deal with at her job (not co-workers) using the expression "in a minute" to mean "in a long time."  For example, "I haven't seen you in a minute."
Ah yes sometimes to emphasize how long the perpetrator may use, " I haven't seen you in a hot minute yo"

#30 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:47 PM

View Postthanes16, on 21 December 2013 - 01:43 PM, said:

Posted Today, 01:29 PM

Posted Image26CornerBlitz, on 21 December 2013 - 03:19 AM, said:

"Continuing along the OT road, when did it become acceptable for people to write could of instead of could have or could've?  WTH is that? Same thing with should of and would of.  There's a guy that I work with who sometimes uses these abominations in work related email.  I immediately question someone's intelligence when I see this although it's probably unfair for me to do so."



This. First word usage that popped into my head when I heard the discussion going on.

Oops! I just used one. How do you hear writing?


There's software that will allow for this.  You're excused. :lol:

#31 TrueBluePhD

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:13 PM

People who don't know their homonyms. Had to grade 100 research papers and it's amazing how many undergrads don't know them. And yes, I do penalize for grammar mistakes.

#32 JujuFish

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:27 PM

View Postinkman, on 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:

Trying to keep the Nikita thread in tact,
Intact.  On a related note, I've also seen "infact" quite a bit.

View Postinkman, on 21 December 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:

My biggest beef right now is how lazy English has made it's way into corporate America.
Its.  No possessive pronouns have apostrophes.  Mine, yours, ours, theirs, his, hers, its.

View PostSabres Fan In NS, on 21 December 2013 - 01:17 PM, said:

Ending a sentence with a preposition ... "oh, yeah?  Were's that at?"
There's nothing inherently wrong with the terminal preposition.  It's been used that way far longer than the "rule" which says not to do so.  Having said that, I probably would avoid it in formal writing.

Also, it really bugs me when people say "where at".  The "at" is completely redundant since "where" literally means "at what place".

Edited by JujuFish, 21 December 2013 - 02:29 PM.


#33 Cereal

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:39 PM

I saw at least two posters in this thread use <<it's>> where <<its>> (without the apostrophe) is appropriate. :w00t:

I hate when people use the word "literally" all the dang time, and they are using it incorrectly, too. "Omigosh I literally died the other day when I heard that...." I really judge those abusers hard......

View PostTrueBluePhD, on 21 December 2013 - 02:13 PM, said:

People who don't know their homonyms. Had to grade 100 research papers and it's amazing how many undergrads don't know them. And yes, I do penalize for grammar mistakes.
I'll second this.  I was astonished by the poor writing skills of senior undergraduate engineering students when I TA'ed a few years ago.

#34 qwksndmonster

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:45 PM

View PostTrueBluePhD, on 21 December 2013 - 02:13 PM, said:

People who don't know their homonyms. Had to grade 100 research papers and it's amazing how many undergrads don't know them. And yes, I do penalize for grammar mistakes.
If you're a stats prof, then you're the devil.

#35 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:48 PM

View PostTrueBluePhD, on 21 December 2013 - 02:13 PM, said:

People who don't know their homonyms. Had to grade 100 research papers and it's amazing how many undergrads don't know them. And yes, I do penalize for grammar mistakes.

Their, there, and they're being prime examples.

Edited by 26CornerBlitz, 21 December 2013 - 02:48 PM.


#36 weave

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:49 PM

There is a radio commercial I hear occasionally on my commute in to work for an energy audit service.  The female voice on the commercial enthusiastically proclaims that she was "literally throwing money out of the window every month".  Really?  Literally throwing money out the window?  Fecking really?  You are telling us that every month you opened up a window and tossed dollar bills through it before you were aware of this service?  And I am supposed to react positively to this commercial?

Should of, would of, literally, epic, your/you're

GET OFF MY LAWN!

#37 SwampD

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:56 PM

resign/re-sign
than/then

What's with Southern tier/Pennsylvania folk that omit the words "to be" in sentences? The lawn need's mowed. Their D needs improved.

That's just weird.

#38 Neuvirths Glove

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:28 PM

People talk the way they talk.  To some extent it's a matter of dialect.  Here in Texas, people call a suite (as in a grouping of furniture) as a "sute" instead of a "sweet."  It drove me nuts, but when I looked it up in the dictionary, I found that "sute" is an accepted regional pronunciation.  In a professional setting, my expectations are higher but I try to temper them with that concept of dialect- that what I consider incorrect was learned as accepted pronunciation by some people.

When it comes to the internet, you have to understand that not everyone is on the same page.  Some people always try to use correct spellings.  Some people just get their ideas out there and don't worry about there/they're/their or you're/your, etc.  If, when you read it, it phonetically makes sense, they're happy with that.  On forums like this, or Facebook, or whatever, I don't sweat it.  On "serious" sites like corporate sites or news sites, I expect a higher level of written English in line with the professional nature of the site.  If a site consistently uses substandard written English, I pretty quickly judge them as unprofessional and don't take what they write as credible.  If they don't properly edit, you wonder of they properly fact-check.

On the other hand, there are misspellings that become memes unto themselves, like using the "moran" in place of "moron" like this guy did:
Posted Image

The misspelling can be used to emphasize or indicate deprecation, mocking, or humor.  I'm kind of fond of using MOAR in place of more.
Posted Image

To me, that's being playful with language; what starts out as an unintentional gaff turns into a variation of the original word intentionally used that carries a subtly different connotation.

To sum up:  If you're speaking professionally, get it right, unless you intentionally don't.

View PostCereal, on 21 December 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:

I hate when people use the word "literally" all the dang time, and they are using it incorrectly, too. "Omigosh I literally died the other day when I heard that...." I really judge those abusers hard......

That's actually an accepted usage now.  Don't be so literal; it's hyperbole for effect.  (At least some) people know that it's not true to the standard meaning of literally but choose to use it anyway as a figure of speech.

#39 Neuvirths Glove

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:31 PM

View PostSwampD, on 21 December 2013 - 02:56 PM, said:

What's with Southern tier/Pennsylvania folk that omit the words "to be" in sentences? The lawn need's mowed. Their D needs improved.

That's just weird.

That's a valid dialect.  I believe it comes from Scotland if I recall correctly; it is a literal translation from the dialect some Scots use into English.  Considering English is conglomeration of many languages, this infusion isn't any worse than countless other contributions from other languages.

#40 JJFIVEOH

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:32 PM

View PostCereal, on 21 December 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:

I saw at least two posters in this thread use <<it's>> where <<its>> (without the apostrophe) is appropriate. :w00t:

I hate when people use the word "literally" all the dang time, and they are using it incorrectly, too. "Omigosh I literally died the other day when I heard that...." I really judge those abusers hard......


I'll second this.  I was astonished by the poor writing skills of senior undergraduate engineering students when I TA'ed a few years ago.

I think I'm guilty of using 'it's' in this thread. Now I know I'll never make that mistake again. :P

I used to help out the undergrads, I didn't grade any papers but they frequently Emailed me with questions. I vast majority of them did so as they were texting me; actiononyms, no punctuation, no sentence structure. It got to the point where it was barely legible. I responded by telling them that in the professional world nobody is going to take them seriously and to re-send the Email using proper English and grammar.

Edited by JJFIVEOH, 21 December 2013 - 03:33 PM.