Jump to content


Any birders?

off topic

  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:39 AM

Bird mystery. I usually have good luck with whatbird.com's search tool, but not this time.

I've never seen this bird around here or heard its call. It looks very much like a robin, but it's lighter in color. The breast seems to be a lighter shade of that warm orange robin's breast. The call is simple but unusual, four or five almost two-toned whistles in a row. Thrushes keep coming up in searches, but the photos are not good matches. And when I listen to thrush calls, it's nothing like this bird's.

Clay-colored robin is a pretty close match, but they don't come north of Texas from what I'm reading. Maybe this one did.

I'll try to post a picture later. I have a recording of the call but don't think I can post it.

#2 d4rksabre

d4rksabre

    Woof

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A stolen Panzer

Posted 03 August 2013 - 11:50 AM

Could it be a robin that is genetically defective?

#3 IKnowPhysics

IKnowPhysics

    Second Liner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,181 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:08 PM

View PostPASabreFan, on 03 August 2013 - 07:39 AM, said:

I have a recording of the call but don't think I can post it.

Not that I'll necessarily be able to help identify it, but you could probably use SoundCloud to share the sound.

#4 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:52 PM

View Postd4rksabre, on 03 August 2013 - 11:50 AM, said:

Could it be a robin that is genetically defective?

There are albino robins, I've learned. This only looks like a robin. It seems to be a bit sleeker.

#5 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 04:27 PM

Attached File  DSC05126.JPG   168.93K   101 downloads

#6 deluca67

deluca67

    67 - The Number of the Beast!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,018 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 August 2013 - 05:50 PM

View PostPASabreFan, on 03 August 2013 - 01:52 PM, said:

There are albino robins, I've learned. This only looks like a robin. It seems to be a bit sleeker.
You need to draft larger birds with grit. ;)

#7 wonderbread

wonderbread

    Caveat emptor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,031 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:02 PM

Not that I consider my self a birder but having spent a fair time in the pa wilds, I'd say it's a young immature robin. The feathers around the neck look like their still the nest feathers.

#8 d4rksabre

d4rksabre

    Woof

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A stolen Panzer

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:18 PM

View Postwonderbread, on 03 August 2013 - 07:02 PM, said:

Not that I consider my self a birder but having spent a fair time in the pa wilds, I'd say it's a young immature robin. The feathers around the neck look like their still the nest feathers.

I think you're probably right however it is quite lacking in the spotting I'd expect on one. The other possibility is that it's some kind of foreign thrush kept as a pet then discarded to the wild.

#9 Neo

Neo

    Top Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 388 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa, FL

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:36 PM

View Postdeluca67, on 03 August 2013 - 05:50 PM, said:


You need to draft larger birds with grit. ;)


Cracked me up!

#10 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:52 PM

View Postd4rksabre, on 03 August 2013 - 07:18 PM, said:

I think you're probably right however it is quite lacking in the spotting I'd expect on one. The other possibility is that it's some kind of foreign thrush kept as a pet then discarded to the wild.

Interesting. It sits on that roof peak for long stretches and keeps coming back. It almost does seem domesticated.

Clay-colored thrush? It's the national bird of Costa Rica!

http://www.briansmal...sh_T0B97059.jpg

View Postwonderbread, on 03 August 2013 - 07:02 PM, said:

Not that I consider my self a birder but having spent a fair time in the pa wilds, I'd say it's a young immature robin. The feathers around the neck look like their still the nest feathers.

If it's a robin, that doesn't explain why it stands out so much, especially the call. There's just something not-Pennsylvania Wild-sy about this bird.

#11 wonderbread

wonderbread

    Caveat emptor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,031 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:54 PM

What ever it is put down the ornithological book and scrap and repaint your fascia.

#12 d4rksabre

d4rksabre

    Woof

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A stolen Panzer

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:59 PM

It almost looks like a female of this species

http://en.m.wikipedi...breasted_Thrush



#13 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:59 PM

View Postwonderbread, on 03 August 2013 - 07:54 PM, said:

What ever it is put down the ornithological book and scrap and repaint your fascia.
:) Neighbor's garage.

#14 JJFIVEOH

JJFIVEOH

    Second Liner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,196 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boca Raton, FL

Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:49 PM

View PostPASabreFan, on 03 August 2013 - 01:52 PM, said:

There are albino robins, I've learned. This only looks like a robin. It seems to be a bit sleeker.

Or they could just be from Buffalo. :angel:

#15 inkman

inkman

    Fledgling Member of TSC

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,535 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairport

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:09 PM

View Postd4rksabre, on 03 August 2013 - 07:59 PM, said:

It almost looks like a female of this species

http://en.m.wikipedi...breasted_Thrush
The ol turdus dissimilis.

#16 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:51 PM

I'm coming around to d4rk's theory that this is a mutated, demented robin. We humans have them, why shouldn't they?

#17 IKnowPhysics

IKnowPhysics

    Second Liner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,181 posts

Posted 04 August 2013 - 03:48 AM

Looks like a female robin.  Several pictures online are showing the light coloration.

Big difference in calls?

#18 qwksndmonster

qwksndmonster

    Livve Neilo

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,053 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Horseheads

Posted 04 August 2013 - 04:06 AM

I glued a wing to my bird.

#19 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 04 August 2013 - 08:45 AM

View PostIKnowPhysics, on 04 August 2013 - 03:48 AM, said:

Looks like a female robin.  Several pictures online are showing the light coloration.

Big difference in calls?

Not a big difference. But I haven't connected it to a robin with any recordings found online.

http://www.learner.o...Dictionary.html

#20 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 04 August 2013 - 08:56 PM

I got within a few feet of this bird today. It was on the side of the garage roof, moving its way up and down in a zig zag fashion. It was also making very familiar robin-like clucking or tutting sounds. Up close, it's almost certainly a robin. It's just very pale, not only the breast but the body.

I have no idea what this bird's story is. Since I got so close, I wonder if it can't see well. Or at all. It's different, that's for sure. (I am resisting the urge to call it an odd bird.) I've kind of grown attached to it. The call is so beautiful and attention-getting. It got my attention, for sure.

This comes at an interesting time. I just finished a work assignment where I interviewed five intellectually and mentally challenged people. Maybe I'm just in a sensitive place, I don't know.

Thanks for the input everyone. Bird-watching seems like it would be a great pastime.

#21 That Aud Smell

That Aud Smell

    That Nostalgic Olfactory Blend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,965 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Ecum Secum, Nova Scotia

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:19 AM

View PostPASabreFan, on 04 August 2013 - 08:56 PM, said:

Bird-watching seems like it would be a great pastime.

It's not my thing, but I think you're right about that. I've watched my little guy phase through a weirdly thorough knowledge about 100+ Thomas the Tank Engine trains, then move onto a detailed familiarity with twice that many Pokemon characters. It's something that a lot of guys tend to be hard-wired for, I think.

Edited by That Aud Smell, 05 August 2013 - 08:19 AM.


#22 d4rksabre

d4rksabre

    Woof

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A stolen Panzer

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:55 AM

View PostThat Aud Smell, on 05 August 2013 - 08:19 AM, said:



It's not my thing, but I think you're right about that. I've watched my little guy phase through a weirdly thorough knowledge about 100+ Thomas the Tank Engine trains, then move onto a detailed familiarity with twice that many Pokemon characters. It's something that a lot of guys tend to be hard-wired for, I think.

You're probably right. I went through very similar phases as a kid, Thomas to Pokemon to paintball guns, cars, motorcycles, etc. You eventually discover that these obsessions build communities. Heck we see it right here with the accumulated knowledge that our members have of all sorts of players, coaches, teams, etc.


Personally I think studying trains and dragon fly species are my next two obsessions.

Oh I also spent a lot of time as a kid studying WW II aircraft. I used to be able to tell you every variant of the Hawker Hurricane or the history of the He. 177 Grief.

#23 Josie914

Josie914

    I don't know how to feel joy anymore

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 635 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bartertown

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:02 AM

View PostThat Aud Smell, on 05 August 2013 - 08:19 AM, said:

It's not my thing, but I think you're right about that. I've watched my little guy phase through a weirdly thorough knowledge about 100+ Thomas the Tank Engine trains, then move onto a detailed familiarity with twice that many Pokemon characters. It's something that a lot of guys tend to be hard-wired for, I think.

I'll step up as a girl who has always catalogued and collected things. As a child i went through many many phases- I could tell you every rock/gemstone. Every amazon tree frog. Every airplane ever (down to serial numbers in different regiments in different theatres of war). Most cars. Civil War and WWII battles. Geography. Eventually Pokemon/any video game I played. Honestly, my knowledge as a younger kid was greater than my knowledge now! I'm starting to do it with hockey players/hockey history now! My sister did it as well (woman learns languages in no time). But I think we're anomalies. Certainly got me made fun of plenty growing up, and probably why I mostly hung out with guys.


I think it's probably a caveman thing- you men had to be out hunting/gathering/keeping tabs on the surrounding dangers... What to eat what not to eat, what kills you, what's safe... Us ladies were in the cave with babies to our breasts.

#24 That Aud Smell

That Aud Smell

    That Nostalgic Olfactory Blend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,965 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Ecum Secum, Nova Scotia

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:24 AM

View Postd4rksabre, on 05 August 2013 - 08:55 AM, said:

Personally I think studying trains and dragon fly species are my next two obsessions. Oh I also spent a lot of time as a kid studying WW II aircraft. I used to be able to tell you every variant of the Hawker Hurricane or the history of the He. 177 Grief.

:w00t:

View PostJosie914, on 05 August 2013 - 09:02 AM, said:

I'll step up as a girl who has always catalogued and collected things.

Good stuff.

#25 d4rksabre

d4rksabre

    Woof

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A stolen Panzer

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:31 AM

View PostThat Aud Smell, on 05 August 2013 - 09:24 AM, said:



:w00t:

[size=4]

Good stuff.

We are certainly knit from similar cloth :D

#26 Sabre Dance

Sabre Dance

    Grin and bear it...

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,349 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South of the city.

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:37 AM

My first impression was that this was a juvenile female robin just approaching maturity.  Females do have lighter coloration, and there does seems to be the remnants of the spotted breast feathers.  That would not account for the call, though.
In my first "real job" after college, I worked with a lady who was an avid birder.  At first, her talking about it kind of drove me batty, but eventually I got sucked in and bought a couple of field guides.  I never got into birding per se, but it did make me more aware of our feathery friends.  I learned enough to know that the odd-looking bird that landed (quite unceremoniously) in the tree behind my apartment was a green heron.  I guess it is not all that rare, but also not so common around here. My co-worker was impressed that I saw one.
It seemed to me that birding sure could be a great pastime.  It gets you outdoors, you have to hike around a bit to see the more unusual birds and it is pretty inexpensive to get involved in. Good for families, too...

View Postd4rksabre, on 05 August 2013 - 08:55 AM, said:


Oh I also spent a lot of time as a kid studying WW II aircraft. I used to be able to tell you every variant of the Hawker Hurricane or the history of the He. 177 Grief.

Did anybody get to see the B-17 Flying Fortress that was here at the airport over the weekend?  Very cool.

#27 PASabreFan

PASabreFan

    Resistance is futile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,521 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 05 August 2013 - 10:05 AM

View PostSabre Dance, on 05 August 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

My first impression was that this was a juvenile female robin just approaching maturity.  Females do have lighter coloration, and there does seems to be the remnants of the spotted breast feathers.  That would not account for the call, though.
In my first "real job" after college, I worked with a lady who was an avid birder.  At first, her talking about it kind of drove me batty, but eventually I got sucked in and bought a couple of field guides.  I never got into birding per se, but it did make me more aware of our feathery friends.  I learned enough to know that the odd-looking bird that landed (quite unceremoniously) in the tree behind my apartment was a green heron.  I guess it is not all that rare, but also not so common around here. My co-worker was impressed that I saw one.
It seemed to me that birding sure could be a great pastime.  It gets you outdoors, you have to hike around a bit to see the more unusual birds and it is pretty inexpensive to get involved in. Good for families, too...



Did anybody get to see the B-17 Flying Fortress that was here at the airport over the weekend?  Very cool.

I once saw a blue heron taking flight. It was almost as painful as watching Dave Andreychuk in open ice.

#28 SwampD

SwampD

    All Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,406 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Jersey, orig. NT

Posted 05 August 2013 - 10:19 AM

Where's Tyrannustyrannus when you need him?

#29 Ghost of Dwight Drane

Ghost of Dwight Drane

    First Liner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,164 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 05 August 2013 - 10:58 AM

View PostSabre Dance, on 05 August 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:


Did anybody get to see the B-17 Flying Fortress that was here at the airport over the weekend?  Very cool.


Didn't go to the airport, but it flew over the house at least 3 times yesterday. Thanks for pointing it out because I had no clue what it was. You can hear it inbound for about 30 seconds, but it wasn't as deep as a C130. With the AF base, you never know what surprises may be flying around and I know they use the airport for approach training. Neat backstory though.

#30 LTS

LTS

    Who's next?

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 913 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mendon, NY (by way of Tonawanda)

Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:20 AM

It's a robin.  My wife is a fairly accomplished birder.  She didn't even hesitate, despite the description of the sound.  Probably a juvenile.

#31 Josie914

Josie914

    I don't know how to feel joy anymore

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 635 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bartertown

Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:23 AM

View PostGhost of Dwight Drane, on 05 August 2013 - 10:58 AM, said:

Didn't go to the airport, but it flew over the house at least 3 times yesterday. Thanks for pointing it out because I had no clue what it was. You can hear it inbound for about 30 seconds, but it wasn't as deep as a C130. With the AF base, you never know what surprises may be flying around and I know they use the airport for approach training. Neat backstory though.

So cool. A couple weeks ago I was at a car show with d4rk and we looked up to see an F-86 Sabre go streaking over. Made our day. Different kind of bird watching :)

#32 Sabre Dance

Sabre Dance

    Grin and bear it...

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,349 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South of the city.

Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:39 AM

View PostGhost of Dwight Drane, on 05 August 2013 - 10:58 AM, said:

Didn't go to the airport, but it flew over the house at least 3 times yesterday. Thanks for pointing it out because I had no clue what it was. You can hear it inbound for about 30 seconds, but it wasn't as deep as a C130. With the AF base, you never know what surprises may be flying around and I know they use the airport for approach training. Neat backstory though.

We went to tour it on Saturday (tours were free; rides cost $450 - eek!).  We arrived at 3:00 or so following the suggested schedule on their web site (The Liberty Foundation - http://www.libertyfo...g/schedule.html). Unfortunately, they were running behind and still had two more flights to do before touring could begin.  We couldn't stay the extra 90 minutes, but we did get to see them fire up the engines and take off.  Pretty dang neat.
Oh, the plane will be in Albany this coming weekend if anyone out that way would be interested...

Edited by Sabre Dance, 05 August 2013 - 11:40 AM.


#33 Claude_Verret

Claude_Verret

    Second Liner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,636 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Holly Springs, NC via Hamburg, NY

Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:49 AM

View PostSabre Dance, on 05 August 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:


Did anybody get to see the B-17 Flying Fortress that was here at the airport over the weekend?  Very cool.

Saw it on Saturday while driving down Millersport, it was flying pretty low and turned right in front of us over the Marriott.

#34 weave

weave

    Self-appointed Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,388 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:in your head

Posted 05 August 2013 - 01:36 PM

View PostSabre Dance, on 05 August 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

Did anybody get to see the B-17 Flying Fortress that was here at the airport over the weekend?  Very cool.

View PostSabre Dance, on 05 August 2013 - 11:39 AM, said:

We went to tour it on Saturday (tours were free; rides cost $450 - eek!).  We arrived at 3:00 or so following the suggested schedule on their web site (The Liberty Foundation - http://www.libertyfo...g/schedule.html). Unfortunately, they were running behind and still had two more flights to do before touring could begin.  We couldn't stay the extra 90 minutes, but we did get to see them fire up the engines and take off.  Pretty dang neat.
Oh, the plane will be in Albany this coming weekend if anyone out that way would be interested...

My grandfather piloted a B-17 over Europe in WWII.  Wish I had known it was there.  I might have made the trip in to see it.  A flight on one is on my bucket list.

#35 cpabob

cpabob

    Prospect

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 54 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 02:59 PM

View Postweave, on 05 August 2013 - 01:36 PM, said:

My grandfather piloted a B-17 over Europe in WWII.  Wish I had known it was there.  I might have made the trip in to see it.  A flight on one is on my bucket list.

Found a nice little video from someone who did it.

https://www.youtube....h?v=X5OCcQovsqk

#36 apuszczalowski

apuszczalowski

    Commander of the Armies of the North

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,750 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 August 2013 - 11:59 AM

Definitly looks like its close to being a Robin, What about an Oriole? I have seen many juvenile Birds around my house this spring/summer. They look odd at first because they are mostly grey but you can see their colors stating to come in. Main ones I have seen are Cardinals and Blue jays.

And why does it have to be Genetically "Defective" just because its Different? How do you know that its Defective and not Better/an Improvement? This could be a genetically superior form of that Birds species!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: off topic