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#1 Lorenzo Von Matterhorn

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 05:52 PM

So I've been looking over drafts in the recent years and got confused with how the process of how these prospects get signed or not. For example, summer 2013 you had to reach an ELC with everyone in your 2011 draft class and we did with everyone except Alex Lepkowski, but how come we didn't have to reach one with Brad Navin, obviously has something to do with that he is in the NCAA as opposed to one of the CHL leagues.

Same goes for the 2010 draft, when Steven Shipley, Gregg Sutch and Cedrick Henley weren't signed but Christian Isackson remains a prospect, even though he has no ELC and all the ones not signed are no longer apart of the organization. Just curious what the rule is that players in the NCAA that are drafted don't need an ELC until they leave school? Any clarification would be helpful

#2 Hoss

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 07:20 PM

Pretty sure that you're right. If you sign a professional contract then you lose the "amateur status" required to play in college. Generally players have an agent that does the negotiating for you, and if you sign with an agent then you're not longer an amateur.

Edited by DStebb, 07 July 2013 - 07:21 PM.


#3 shrader

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 08:39 PM

Pretty sure that you're right. If you sign a professional contract then you lose the "amateur status" required to play in college. Generally players have an agent that does the negotiating for you, and if you sign with an agent then you're not longer an amateur.


College kids have agents too. They're just called "family advisors" instead. They don't get any money from the family as long as the kid is in college

#4 Hoss

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 09:12 PM

College kids have agents too. They're just called "family advisors" instead. They don't get any money from the family as long as the kid is in college


Therefore they're not agents. :flirt:

#5 thesportsbuff

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 09:40 PM

So I've been looking over drafts in the recent years and got confused with how the process of how these prospects get signed or not. For example, summer 2013 you had to reach an ELC with everyone in your 2011 draft class and we did with everyone except Alex Lepkowski, but how come we didn't have to reach one with Brad Navin, obviously has something to do with that he is in the NCAA as opposed to one of the CHL leagues.

Same goes for the 2010 draft, when Steven Shipley, Gregg Sutch and Cedrick Henley weren't signed but Christian Isackson remains a prospect, even though he has no ELC and all the ones not signed are no longer apart of the organization. Just curious what the rule is that players in the NCAA that are drafted don't need an ELC until they leave school? Any clarification would be helpful


Found this on WikiPedia. Lower half is relevant to your question, but the whole block is worth reading to get a better understanding of the process.

  • During the NHL regular season, a team may have a maximum of 23 players on the active roster, except for the period from December 19 to December 27, during which no player may be assigned to the AHL or ECHL, and after the NHL trade deadline.
    • After the NHL trade deadline, an NHL team is limited to four non-emergency callups from their minor league affiliates until their AHL or ECHL affiliate's season has ended (that is, callups from the AHL or ECHL who are not replacing injured players). Additions to the NHL roster, however, can come from players on the reserve list (see below) who leave collegiate, major junior, or European hockey clubs to sign entry-level contracts. Examples of the latter include Jack Johnson, who left Michigan late in the spring 2007 semester and jumped directly to the Los Angeles Kings for the end of the 2006–07season, and Marcus Kruger, who was signed by the Chicago Blackhawks off of its reserve list; Kruger left Djurgårdens in Sweden following the conclusion of its season to sign his entry-level contract and was immediately dressed by Chicago at the end of the 2010–11 season.
    • Following the end of a team's AHL or ECHL affiliate's season, unlimited callups are allowed, provided that a player is signed to one of its 50 contract slots.
  • A team must have at least 24 players, 3 of whom must be goaltenders, under contract at any given moment during the regular season.
  • A team may not have more than 50 players under contract at any point during the season. This limit includes players on injured reserve or long-term injured reserve.
    • Exception: A 18- or 19-year old player with remaining major junior eligibility, or a player who is drafted from a European team who is then selected in the CHL Import Draft, does not count toward the contract limit until he has played at least 11 NHL games, if the player is assigned to his major-junior team only.
  • A team may not have more than 90 players on its reserve lists at any one time during a season. The reserve list includes players under contract, unsigned draft picks who have collegiate or major junior eligibility remaining, and all unsigned draft picks who have been drafted by a team within the last two league years. NHL teams retain exclusive rights to draft picks for two years after a player is drafted, or until NCAA or major junior eligibility has been exhausted.
  • Players can only sign a contract for up to seven years. If they re-sign with their current team, the maximum length is eight years which can result in possible sign-and-trade deals.


So, in summary: Teams maintain the rights to their draft picks (on the reserve list) for two years, or until their major junior/NCAA eligibility is used up. Players who take the CHL route are only eligible to play in the CHL until age 20, at which point teams must give them an ELC or allow the player to become a free agent.

Players who take the college route maintain eligibility for up to 5 years. Once a player has used up all 5 years of eligibility in college, the team must sign him or he becomes a free agent. I don't think there is an age limit on playing in college, but since most players go to college at 18, it is not uncommon for them to be 22 or 23 before being signed to a pro contract.

Darcy (or was it Devine?) touched on this subject in one of his post-draft interviews. The Sabres drafted 11 players, several of which will be going to college in the fall. This gives them a few extra years to develop as opposed to guys they drafted out of Major Junior, which they'll likely have to make a decision on within 2 years. This also helps with the 50-contract limit, as instead of having to sign all 11 players at once, they'll only have to sign a few each year.

Edited by thesportsbuff, 07 July 2013 - 09:41 PM.